Action Members are any researcher who participates actively in PROTEOSTASIS. All Members belong to one or more Working Group. Members can include researchers from COST Countries, Near Neighbour and International Partner Countries.

Eyal Gur

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Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
http://lifeserv.bgu.ac.il
Israel
WG2
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Molecular biology, Biochemistry, bacterial genetics and physiology, mycobacterial research techniques.
Fabio MARTINON

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University of Lausanne
http://www.unil.ch
Switzerland
WG3
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Our group is specialized in the study of signal transduction pathways in the UPR as well as in inflammation and innate immunity. Skills: Western Blot and protein analysis analysis Molecular Biology Inflammasome biology Lentivarial libraries (Crispr/cas9 and shRNAs) Mouse models of inflammation and cancer
Farid El Oualid

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UbiQ Bio BV
http://www.ubiqbio.com
Netherlands
WG6
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1) Chemical development of new reagents for the Ubiquitin Proteasome Field. 2) Drug discovery in the Ubiquitin Proteasome Field: high-throughput screening programs in collaboration with partners
Francesco Licausi

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Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna
http://www.plantlab.sssup.it
Italy
WG3
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Oxygen sensing in plants.
Frauke Melchior

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Zentrum für Molekulare Biologie der Universität Heidelberg. ZMBH
http://www.zmbh.uni-heidelberg.de
Germany
WG3
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Research in our group centers around posttranslational modification with small ubiquitin-related proteins of the SUMO family. Like ubiquitin, these proteins can be covalently and reversibly linked to other proteins. Attachment of SUMO serves to regulate protein-protein interactions, subcellular localization, enzymatic activity and stability. Projects in the lab aim at understanding mechanisms, regulation and function of SUMOylation in mammalian cells. We are interested in basic principles of reversible sumoylation (enzymes, targets and acceptor sites), connections between SUMOylation and nucleocytoplasmic transport (focusing, e.g., on the nucleoporin and E3 Ligase RanBP2/Nup358), links between SUMO- and ubiquitin-conjugation pathways, and regulation of sumoylation by redox-signaling
Frederica Theodoulou

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Rothamsted Research
http://www.rothamsted.ac.uk
UK
WG1
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Targeted protein degradation in plants, in particular the N-end rule pathway. We use quantitative proteomics, quantitative imaging, traditional biochemistry and genetics to understand the roles of proteostasis in plants with the longer-term goal of crop improvement.
Fumiyo Ikeda

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Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, IMBA
http://www.imba.oeaw.ac.at
Austria
WG2
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Inflammatory regulation by ubiquitin networks, Ubiquitin is one of the most sophisticated and versatile post-translational modifications that regulate numerous biological functions, including inflammation, apoptosis, cancer, cell cycle, DNA repair, Parkinson?s disease and endocytosis. Depending on how Ubiquitin molecules are linked by enzymatic actions, they can form different topological chains on target proteins. These ubiquitin chains with different ?appearances? recruit distinct protein networks that function to specifically regulate various aspects of physiology. By using various approaches from biochemistry techniques to genetically modified animal models, we aim to dissect how ubiquitin networks control inflammatory responses.
Gabor Banhegyi

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Semmelweis University
http://semmelweis.hu
Hungary
WG4
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Investigation of the redox systems and their connections in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen. ER transporters for electron carriers. Redox effects in the ER stress. Connections between luminal redox, apoptosis and autophagy.
Gael Roué

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Consorci Institut D'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS)
http://www.idibaps.org
Spain
WG6
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Aggressive B-cell lymphomas are clinically and pathologically diverse and reflect multiple pathways of transformation. Alterations in oncogenes like MYC, BCL2, and CCND1/BCL1 play a key role in the progression of the malignant clone and correlate with a high failure rate in treatment protocols, especially in "double hit" cases with translocation of two oncogenes. However, recent studies are pointing to signals related to the lymphoid microenvironment as the real determinants of this process. For the design of new therapies more selective and more suited to the biology of these lymphomas, this project focuses on the characterization of new cancer drugs able to interfere specifically with c-myc, Bcl-2 or cyclin D1, in in vitro and in vivo models of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and "double hit" lymphomas. We will value especially the therapeutic potential of these inhibitors in combination with conventional therapy (R-CHOP, Velcade), and experimental therapies against tumour microenvironment or based on the activation of the apoptosis program. The main research areas include the analysis of therapeutic compounds developed and validated by recognized pharmaceutical companies and academic groups, and the molecular and genetic characterization of the factors that determine the efficacy and safety of each treatment, in a set of MCL and DLBCL primary samples, a panel of 20 cell lines representative of each entity, and in a transgenic, systemic or xenotransplant mouse models of MCL, DLBCL and "double hit" lymphomas.In addition we are also interested in the role of microenvironment (mainly in the lymph nodes and bone marrow) as a source of survival signalling and as cause of relapses and resistance to therapy in Follicular Lymphoma (FL) and MCL. We are dissecting the pathways underlying tumor- stroma cell interactions. The accompanying cells we are working with are mesenquimal stromal cells (MSCs) , follicular dendrytic cells (FDCs) and macrophages. We have set up good in vitro and in vivo mouse models. The final aim is to design therapies or combination of them that abrogate this signalling and improve patient outcome. In this area we are also working in close collaboration with pharma companies, in order to test compounds that are already in preclinical phase for any disease, speeding up the bench-bedside process in our models of study. Finally, we are also interested in new generation antibodies to improve current immunotherapy approaches. Currently, we are investigating the efficacy of an anti-CD38 antibody in vitro and in vivo, in the models of MCL, FL and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)
Gemma Marfany

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Universitat de Barcelona. UB
http://www.ub.edu
Spain
WG6
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We are geneticists besides being molecular biologists. We actively search for genes involved in human hereditary visual diseases causing blindness. Another of our research lines is the characterization of the expression and function of deubiquitinating and SUMO-metabolism enzymes in the retina.
George Diallinas

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UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS. FACULTY OF BIOLOGY
http://diallinas-group.biol.uoa.gr
Greece
WG1
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Speciality: Expression, structure, function, cell biology and evolution of transporters. Use of Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model systems for: a) genetically and biochemically dissecting structure-function relationships underlying purine-pyrimidine transporter function, specificity and molecular evolution, b) dentifying the pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in the membrane trafficking, endocytosis and turnover of specific transporters in response to various physiological, developmental and genetic signals, c) studying the role of transporters in fungal pathogenicity and use in silico modeling of specific purine transporters for rational antifungal drug design. Skills: Fungal classical and reverse genetics and physiology; Biochemistry-Transport assays; Molecular biology; Cell biology-in vivo fluorescent microscopy; Modeling and docking
Georgios Skretas

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Institute of biology. medical chemistry&biotechnology (IBMCB). National hellenic Research Foundation
http://www.eie.gr
Greece
WG6
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Discovery of pharmacological chaperones with potentially therapeutic compounds against protein misfolding diseases (Alzheimer?s disease, cancer, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and others), Directed protein evolution, Membrane protein biogenesis and folding, Enzyme engineering for industrial applications, Synthetic biology, Genetic engineering of microorganisms for the production of high-value products, Development of biosensors of protein conformations/dynamic Skills: Studies of protein folding and misfolding, directed protein evolution, protein engineering, microbial genetic engineering, high-throughput screening, production of hardto-express proteins
Germana Meroni

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Cluster in Biomedicine (CBM). AREA Science Park / Burlo Garofolo Hospitale
http://www.cbm.fvg.it
Italy
WG1
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Study of the TRIM family of RING-E3 ubiquitin ligases using: i) a systematic genomic and biochemical approaches and ii) a focused study on TRIM members implicated in genetic disorders.
Gilles Lalmanach

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Université François-Rabelais, Tours
http://www.cepr.inserm.univ-tours.fr
France
WG6
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Our group has a recognized experience in enzymology, biochemistry and chemistry of peptides/proteins. It also has a valuable expertise in the biophysicochemical characterizationof proteins/peptides as well as the study of molecular interactions. Recently, the team -basically turned to a fundamental approach - has expanded its fields of competence and has developed in cellulo studies of regulatory mechanisms (including signaling pathways) of proteolysis in pulmonary inflammation in collaboration with clinicians.
Giovanna Serino

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Sapienza Universita' di Roma
http://bbcd.bio.uniroma1.it
Italy
WG1
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The research in our lab aims at understanding the function and mode of action of a highly conserved protein complex, the COP9 signalosome (CSN)
Giovanni Cenci

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SAPIENZA University of Rome
http://cencilabsapienza.weebly.com
Italy
WG1
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Study of Drosophila Cell Division, Chromosome Integrity and Telomere Maintenance
Gloria Lopez-Castejon

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Manchester Collaborative Centre for Inflammation Research (MCCIR), University of Manchester
http://www.mccir.ls.manchester.ac.uk
United Kingdom
WG6
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My lab focuses in in vitro work using both cell lines and primary cultured macrophages (mouse and human). We routinely perform qPCR, Western blot, IP, Co-IP, ELISA and imaging. We are also developing the use of mass spec, protein interactions by BRET as well as flow cytometry.
Guillaume Bossis

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CNRS: IGMM (Institut de Génétique Moléculaire de Montpellier)
http://
France
WG1
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Our work focuses on the SUMO pathway and its role in the context of Acute Myeloid Leukemias (AML). In particular, we are interested in its regulation by Reactive Oxygen Species, and its role in the control of gene expression programs during AML treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs and its deregulations in chemoresistance.
Gustavo J. Gutierrez

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Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)
http://dbio.vub.ac.be
Belgium
WG5
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Ubiquitin and SUMO systems in cell cycle and signaling pathways, especially those linked to mechanisms of disease.
Gwenael Rabut

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IGDR - Institute of Genetics and Development of Rennes
http://igdr.univ-rennes1.fr
France
WG1
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Nuclear ubiquitylation
Hagai Abeliovich

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No website
Israel

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Speciality:Molecular selectivity of mitophagic processes in baker?s yeast Skills: 1) enzyme assays for autophagic processes and for enzyme engineering 2) western blotting, proteomics 3) fluorescence and electron microscopy 4) cell fractionation 5) protease protection
Harald Stenmark

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The Norwegian Radium Hospital
http://www.ous-research.no
Norway
WG2
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Basic cell biology with emphasis on endocytosis, autophagy and cytokinesis as potential tumour suppressor mechanisms. Molecular biology or Rab GTPases and PI 3-kinases. Mammalian cell culture and Drosophila models.
Harald Wodrich

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Université Bordeaux
http://www.mfp.cnrs.fr
France
WG2
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We study Host-pathogen interactions during virus entry and the onset of viral gene expression using adenovirus (AdV) infection as a model system.
Harrold van den Burg

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University of Amsterdam
http://www.uva.nl
Netherlands
WG1
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SUMO-dependent signaling in the plant defense response using plant genetics, proteomics and functional complementation studies. We focus primarily on the SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1. - Study the evolution of SUMO paralogues in the plant kingdom. - Study non-K48 Ubiquitin chain substrates that control plant innate immune signaling. - Study bacterial/fungal effector proteins that suppress host signaling, in particular Ubl-dependent processes. - Study the cross-talk between phosphorylation and SUMOylation in plant innate immune signaling.
Heike Laman

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University of Cambridge
http://www.path.cam.ac.uk
United Kingdom
WG5
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We work on SCF-type E3 ubiquitin ligases and their role in cancer and Parkinson?s disease. We are looking at the interface between ubiquitination, autophagy, and proteolysis and how cell cycle regulation and differentiation are coordinated with these basic processes. We also have a novel, proprietory protein transduction reagent, which we are testing for its capaity to work as a therapeutic. We take a biochemical approach studying the activity of purified E3 ubiquitin ligases against specific substrates; cell biology approaches looking at the roles of the ligases in cultured cancer cell lines and ES cells with effects on cell cycle, differentiation, autophagy, and apoptosis; and in vivo models, using genetically altered mice looking at the role of ubiquitin ligases in development and disease in different tissue types.
Henrique Girao

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IBILI-Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Life Sciences
http://www.uc.pt
Portugal
WG3
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We have been interested on the molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of quality control, with particular focus on non-canonical functions of ubiquitin on lysosomal degradation. For this purpose, we have been studying two main substrates, the HIF1-a, on the context of hypoxia-induced neovascularization, and CxIn our lab routine we use mammalian cell and organ cultures, biochemical techniques, protein manipulation (including overexpression and silencing), confocal and transmission electron microscopy43, involved in gap junction intercellular communication, on the context of heart diseases. In more detail, we have been using these proteins to evaluate the putative crosstalk between proteasome and autophagy, and autophagy and endocytosis
Homa Tajsharghi

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University of Gothenburg
http://biomedicine.gu.se
Sweden

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Protein aggregate is the characteristic pathomorphological feature of a number of human muscle diseases, ‘’Protein Aggregate Myopathies (PAM)’’, including those caused by mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins. The specific objectives of
Huib Ovaa

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Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC)
http://research.nki.nl
Netherlands
WG2
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Current research in the Chemical Biology group aims at the development of tools to investigate biochemical processes in relation to cancer. The group plays a leading role in the development of techniques to profile cellular enzymatic activities associated primarily with ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like systems as well as proteasome activity. We use an organic synthesis and mass spectrometry driven approach in order to gain further understanding of the biochemical processes under investigation. The aim is to create diagnostic tools and small molecule modulators of enzymatic properties for the detection and treatment of cancer respectively, well in line with the current consortium goals. Our method is pragmatic; we focus on the search for inhibitors of enzymatic activities by high and ultra-throughput screening of small molecule libraries followed by lead-optimization and on the development of biochemical tools by rational design. Key techniques covered are: organic synthesis in classical and parallel formats, classical biochemistry, high and ultra-throughput screening and fluorescence-based technologies. The group generally applies whatever method fits the needs best for follow-up investigations using innovative tools that are developed in-house.
Ignacio Melero

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CIMA. Universidad de Navarra
http://www.cima.es
Spain
WG6
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Immunotherapy of cancer
Ignacio Pérez-Roger

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Fac. Ciencias de la Salud. Universidad CEU-Cardenal Herrera
http://www.uchceu.es
Spain
WG5
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We study the implication of protein degradation in development and disease and the possible application of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of cancer.
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