Action Members are any researcher who participates actively in PROTEOSTASIS. All Members belong to one or more Working Group. Members can include researchers from COST Countries, Near Neighbour and International Partner Countries.

Daniel James Gibbs

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University of Birmingham
http://sites.google.com
UK
WG1
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Functions and substrates of the arginylation and acetylation branches of the N-end rule pathway in plants.
Daniel Taillandier

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INRA de Clermont-Theix - UNH
http://www6.clermont.inra.fr
France
WG1
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Identification of E2-E3 couples involved in muscle specific ubiquitination. E2-E3-dependent ubiquitin transfer on protein substrate.Role of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) in skeletal muscle during catabolic situations
Danilo Milardi

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Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini
http://www.ibb.cnr.it
Italy
WG2
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Dr. Milardi is using various experimental and theoretical methods to study protein stability, and to characterize how environmental factors (e. g. lipid membranes and metal ions) may promote protein misfolding/aggregation. More recently, he has focused on the role played by environmental factors in causing the derangement of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System.
David A. Tumbarello

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Centre for Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Highfield Campus
http://www.southampton.ac.uk
UK
WG2
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My research focuses on understanding the cellular mechanisms and molecular machinery required for subcellular trafficking of membrane associated and cytosolic cargo via endocytosis and autophagy. In addition, I am interested in how these processes influence cell signalling, cytoskeletal reorganisation and cell morphogenesis. More specifically, some of my work has investigated how autophagy receptor specificity towards distinct cargo is coordinated and what defines their individual cellular function. My lab utilises various biochemical and cell biology approaches to dissect these processes to further our understanding of these complex interrelationships. Understanding the requirements for receptor as well as cytosolic cargo degradation and their relationship to cellular morphogenesis is vital to understanding a variety of diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration, which stem from defects in various membrane trafficking and cell signalling pathways.
David Alabadí

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Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas (CSIC-UPV)
http://www.ibmcp.upv.es
Spain
WG3
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Plant Molecular Biology, Biotechnology
David Komander

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No website
United Kingdom
WG1
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Speciality: Specificity in the ubiquitin system. Skills: We do everything from structural biology by X-ray crystallography, NMR and EM, biochemistry, biophysics to cell biology, CRISPR knockins and mouse knockouts.
David Martin

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Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE)
http://molevol.cmima.csic.es
Spain
WG3
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My group studies to role of SUMO in the hormonal control of insect embryogenesis, post-embryonic growth, molting and metamorphosis, particularly the roles of the ecdysteroids and juvenile hormones. We are also interested in the hormonal basis of the evolution of metamorphosis, from hemimetaboly to holometaboly
David Teis

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Biocenter. Division Cell Biology. Innsbruck Medical University
http://www.i-med.ac.at
Austria
WG2
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My group is interested in the molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell signaling with lysosomal membrane protein degradation. The ubiquitin dependent degradation of membrane protein inside lysosomes requires the so-called multivesicular body (MVB) pathway. Defects in this essential degradation pathway contribute to hallmarks of cancer such as loss of cell polarity, defects in cell migration and enhanced proliferation and hence can be considered a tumor supressor pathway. A key step for membrane protein degradation occurs on endosomes, where the endosomal complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) sort ubiquitinated membrane proteins (eg. EGFR) via the MVB pathway to the lumen of lysosomes for degradation. This essential, ESCRT-dependent, degradation pathway controls the cellular repertoire of membrane proteins, including mitogenic cell surface receptors. Loss of ESCRT function blocks the MVB pathway and results in the intracellular accumulation of membrane proteins. Consequently, the ESCRT machinery is involved in diverse developmental processes and its dysfunction contributes to many diseases including cancer and neuro-degeneration. Moreover, the same ESCRT machinery is hijacked by viruses such as HIV to promote their release from host cells. Due to the universal function of the ESCRT machinery in eukaryotes, we use yeast as the best suited model system and a combination of genetics, biochemistry and imaging to address the following questions: 1. How does the ESCRT machinery form MVB vesicles? 2. How do cells react to the loss of ESCRT function?
Devrim Gozuacik

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SABANCI University
http://myweb.sabanciuniv.edu
Turkey
WG2
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Autophagic degradation as a stress and death mechanism in health and disease. MicroRNA networks regulating autophagic protein and mitochondria degradation. Autophagy-proteasome crosstalks. Autophagy-cell death connections. Autophagic degradation in cancer and degenerative diseases. Skills: General molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry techniques, lab animal experience, experience with clinical materials and human tissue banking. Specific techniques: Autophagic activity tests, lysosomal activity tests, mitophagy tests, apoptosis and stress analyses, proteasomal degradation tests, miRNA analyses, gene expression tests, confocal microscopy analyses, TEM analyses, animal experiments.
Didier Attaix

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Clermont University. Deputy Director. CRNH Auvergne
No website
France
WG2
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? Role of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) and autophagy in muscle wasting conditions and sarcopenia, and in muscle recovery Identification of signaling pathways targeting the proteolytic systems, including regulation by nutritional factors ? Intestinal proteolysis Cross-talk between skeletal muscle and the intestine ? Identification of biomarkers of sarcopenia both in animal models and human cohorts Mechanisms leading to sarcopenia
Dimitris Liakopoulos

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CRBM/CNRS
http://www.crbm.cnrs.fr
France
WG5
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Speciality:The group investigates the mechanisms controlling spindle positioning in yeast and the regulation of the proteins involved in this process. Keywords: Spindle Positioning, Microtubule- and Actin Cytoskeleton, Cell Cycle, Posttranslational Modifications, SUMO, Ubiquitin. Skills: Yeast genetics , cell biology, biochemistry, life cell imaging and image analysis
Dimitris Xirodimas

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CRBM (Macromolecular Biochemistry Research Centre). CNRS. UMR 5237
http://www.crbm.cnrs.fr
France
WG5
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Our research is focused on the ubiquitin-like molecule NEDD8. Our aim is to identify and characterise novel substrates for NEDD8 and understand how NEDDylation is controlled in cells. In particular we are exploiting our discoveries on the role of NEDD8 as sensor of cellular stress. Our initial studies demonstrated that in response to perturbations in cell growth the NEDD8 pathway causes the activation of the p53 tumour suppressor through the nucleolus. More recent studies identified a more general role for NEDD8 in cellular stress. In response to a variety of stress signals, including inhibition of 26S proteasome activity, heat shock, oxidative stress NEDD8 conjugation rapidly increases. However, this stress-induced NEDD8 conjugation is mediated through enzymes of the ubiquitin rather than of the NEDD8 pathway. By developing methods to specifically distinguish between NEDDylation and ubiquitination sites we found the formation of either poly-NEDD8 or mixed NEDD8-ubiquitin chains under stress. A key goal of our research is to elucidate the biological significance for the NEDD8 response upon stress conditions. We are using biochemical, biological, proteomic and currently developing genetic approaches (C.elegans) to address the above biological questions.
Donata Wawrzycka

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Wroclaw University
http://www.biologia.uni.wroc.pl
Poland
WG4
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Speciality: I use the yeast eukaryotic model to study molecular basis of cell resistance to different stress i.e. metal, inhibitors, chemioterapeutic agents, DNA damage agents. For that purpose I use molecular genetics techniques, flow cytometry, live imaging (fluorescence microscopy), gene-by-gene expression analysis (real-time PCR); protein expression and post-modifications evaluation by western blot; DNA cloning, mutagenesis heterological expression. Skills: Research associate with 15 years of solid experience in conducting researches in the field of molecular biology and genetics, designing and executing research projects, organizing and conducting lectures and practical courses of genetics for students, supervising and assistance to undergraduate and graduate students. I have extensive experience in yeast molecular biology, molecular and classical genetics researches, communication of research results verbally and in writing, project management and laboratory organization and management.
Eduardo Rodriguez Bejarano

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Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterranea (IHSM). Universidad de Málaga
http://www.ihsm.uma-csic.es
Spain
WG1
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SPECIALITY: Plant-virus interaction Skills: Techniques used in plant molecular biology, plant-virus-whiteflies interactions, plant sumoilation
Edurne BERRA

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CIC bioGUNE
http://www.cicbiogune.es
Spain
WG6
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Speciality: Physiopathology of the molecular mediators of the Hypoxia Pathway. Skills: Biochemistry skills (SDS-PAGE, WB, IPs, protein purification) Molecular Biology skills (plasmid preparation, ligation, transformation, RNA extraction, qRT-PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, ChIP) Cell Biology skills (cell culture, transfections, silencing, reporter assay, microscopy, cell cloning, cell proliferation assay)
Eeva-Liisa Eskelinen

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University of Helsinki. Department of Biosciences. Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology. group Eskelinen
http://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi
Finland
WG2
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Speciality: Basic cell biology of autophagy and lysosomal membrane proteins in mammalian cells. Skills: Basic cell biology methods, basic molecular biology methods, cell culture, electron microscopy (including immunoEM, quantitative EM and EM tomography), immunofluorescence microscopy
Efthimios M. C. Skoulakis

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Alexander Fleming Biomedical Sciences Research Centre
http://www.fleming.gr
Greece
WG6
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Neuroscience of Learning and memory, Fly models of learning and memory disabilities and neurodegenerative diseases. Olfaction and olfactory receptors
Elah Pick

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University of Haifa
http://sci2.haifa.ac.il
Israel
WG2
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Activation and activity of the COP9 signalosome; CRLs activity; developing CSN readout assay; NEDDylation/deneddylation; moonlighting within components of PCI complexes; The COP9 SIGNALOSOME in stress, cancer and neurodegeneration. The CSN/NEDD8 axis upon oxidative stress. Regulation of the Mevalonate pathway, also known as the Isoprenoid pathway by the COP9 signalosome.
Elena Santonico

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Tor Vergata University of Rome
http://bio.uniroma2.it
Italy
WG1
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My research interests are mainly focused on three subject areas, all referred to the issue of the intracellular proteostasis. I firstly studied proteins governing the endocytosis of membrane receptors, with particular interest in the involvement of the RING E3-ligase RNF11 in the modulation of cargo adaptors of the internalization machinery. I also investigated the cross-regulation between RNF11 and the family of HECT-E3 ligases that are known to be RNF11 binding partners. Secondly, I explored the basis of promiscuity and selectivity between Ubiquitin and NEDD8 and characterized a novel binding domain, named CUBAN, for Cullin Binding domain associating with NEDD8, that shows a clear preference for the Ubl molecule. Currently, I’m moving toward the integration of the previous research lines in a wider theme, with the aim of investigating the cross-talk between RNA metabolism and intracellular trafficking and how the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is involved in this connection.
Elke Krüger

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Charité Universitaetsmedizin Berlin
http://biochemie.charite.de
Germany
WG6
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Main field: Biochemistry, Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine; Other fields: Molecular Immunology; special research interest: Proteostasis in inflammation, cancer, and neurodeneration
Emily Gudrun Flashman

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University of Oxford
http://flashman.chem.ox.ac.uk
United Kingdom
WG1
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Enzymology, in particular the molecular mechanisms of oxygenases.
Emmanuel Dejardin

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University of Liège
http://www.virofond.ulg.ac.be
Belgium
WG3
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Our laboratory is dedicated to decipher the signaling pathways downstream of various TNF receptor members and to understand how biochemical modifications of key proteins contribute to the biological outcome of these receptors. Our main in vivo studies focus on the mechanisms that contribute to TNFR-mediated inflammation and cancer progression.
Emmanuel Lemichez

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INSERM
http://www.unice.fr
France
WG1
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cellular microbiology and cancer research
Emmanuelle Graciet

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Maynooth University
http://www.maynoothuniversity.ie
Ireland

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My research focuses on the role of protein degradation mediated by the ubiquitin system in the regulation of developmental processes, as well as in the response of plants to pathogens. For this work, we use the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, but also crops such as barley and turnip, in combination with biochemical, molecular, genetic and genomics approaches.
Emmanuelle Liaudet-Coopman

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Institut de Recherche en Cancérologie de Montpellier. Inserm U896 - Université Montpellier1
http://www.ircm.fr
France
WG3
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Cell Biology, breast cancer, proteases, tumor microenvironment, autophagy
Endre Kiss-Toth

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University of Sheffield
http://www.sheffield.ac.uk
UK
WG6
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Speciality: My group is interested in the molecular control mechanisms of intracellular signal transduction. We have a special focus in pathways involved in TLR signalling (MAPK and NFkB) but have recently been expanding our interests to those regulating metabolism; including the PI3K system. Our work includes discovery platforms for the identification of novel signalling molecules in cell based screens, and the characterization of the molecular mechanism of action for some of the novel genes. More recently, we started using cutting edge rodent genetic models to investigate the importance of the family of tribbles pseudokinases in immunity, metabolism and the development of experimental atherosclerosis.Skills: Molecular biology, mutagenesis, cloning, Cell biology, including transient transfection of cell lines and primary cells, Luciferase and GFP based reporter assays, Microscopy Imaging, models and analysis of experimental atherosclerosis, including histological techniques.
Eric Chevet

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Inserm
http://oss-clcc-rennes.com
France
WG4
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Speciality: The laboratory focuses on the mechanisms that control endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and their implication in oncogenesis. Two major research programs are ongoing in the laboratory focusing on i) the signaling of the Unfolded Protein Response in cancers and more particularly on IRE1-dependent signaling cascades; and ii) stress-regulated endoplasmic reticulum folding and degradation mechanisms including folding sensing in the lumen of the ER and p97/VCP dependent mechanisms in the cytosol. Skills: Basic biochemistry, and molecular cell biology; In vitro biochemical screening methodologies
Eric Reits

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AMC University of Amsterdam
http://www.amc.nl
Netherlands
WG2
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Advanced fluorescence microscopy (FRAP/FLIP, FLIM superresolution)
Erika Isono

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Technical University of Munich
http://sysbiol.wzw.tum.de
Germany
WG3
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Regulation of ubiquitination in endocytic protein degradation
Erwin Knecht

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CIPF - Valencia
http://www.cipf.es
Spain
WG2
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Autophagy and proteasomes: regulation and alterations in rare diseases
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